What type of clinician would you like SNATS to provide in Spring 2018?

Tuesday, July 14, 2009

Teaching voice...YOUR voice, and YOUR brain!

As most of you know, I've been studying with a renowned voice teacher in Vienna. We've had three lessons a week for two weeks, and it's been a very intensive experience, as you can imagine. I've learned a great deal as a singer, and anticipate this will translate to some interesting changes as a teacher, too. Here's why: I tend to be pretty concrete. Do this with your tongue, watch your alignment, be sure that vowel is a reall "oo," etc. I tend to respond well to this kind of teaching, and (as we learned from my Kolb workshop), my default teaching style corresponds predictably. I do try to meet each of you where you are and speak your language, as it were, but I want to continue growing in that area. Here's what's been so interesting about this summer: my teacher here is extremely abstract. And I mean, REALLY abstract, at least to my mind. No muscles directly addressed, no tongue position, nothing that I might consider concrete. [There is ONE concrete thing, though. We'll talk about pelvic floor later; this has been astounding.] Sometimes I'm not sure what she's talking about, even though our lessons are in English. But I jump in and do it, and am hearing a HUGE difference on my recordings. It seems that even if my conscious brain doesn't always understand, my subconscious does. Or my body does. Who knows? All I know is, it's working. So the question I want to pose to all of you is, how do you learn in lessons? This might be different than standard classroom learning. Which lessons jumped out at you as breakthrough lessons? Where did you hear progress? Would you be open to trying totally new approaches? Talk to me, and please be as free-form as you wish. I'm really interested in hearing what each of you have to say. This could impact our experience together in a powerful way! Please post here, and see what other people have to say, too. Reading other responses might spark something in your own mind that hadn't before occurred to you. Looking forward to your thoughts.

Simple practicing mistakes and how to fix them

When in doubt, re-read your "How to practice" sheet, given to you the first Friday class of the semester.  More tips from a pro (...